I will be speaking at JavaZone 2010 about NIO.2

Well, my abstract for a session in JavaZone 2010 accepted and I will be speaking about NIO.2, you may call it new new IO, more new IO or technically JSR-203,on 8th of September in saloon 1. I will be the second speaker in the first day of the conference so the timing will be something like 10:15 to 11:15. The session will be in English and I will give the audience an overview of IO features in Java 7 and its differences improvements over old IO framework. I estimated that  I will be speaking for 55 minutes to present something around 35 slides which I have prepared their sketch.

JavaZone 2010, Oslo
JavaZone 2010, JavaZone logo

Majority of the slides will discuss the file system capabilities included in the NIO.2, some slides will cover the differences between I/O with Java 7 and I/O in older releases. Some slides will discuss Asynchronous I/O, and other cool features of NIO.2. Almost all slides come with a sample code showing the concept in action. I will try to include more about my presentation and slides while I am completing the sketch and the first draft.

OpenSolaris Governing Board effort on turning some lights on OpenSolaris future

Well, After sometime that Oracle decided to keep complete silence, either on analog radio or via digital mediums, OGB (OpenSolaris Governing Board) which is a body of some experienced community member governing the community took action and called on Oracle publicly to decide about what it is going to do about the project.

Long story short, because of Oracle silence about what is going on behind the curtains community members turned restless of not knowing what will happen next which the piece of software they deployed into some of their customers server rooms. Some are looking to know when they can install the promised upgrade on the customer machines to reduce the disk space usage while other are ballistic not knowing whether they should go with OpenSolaris installations or they should turn to *BSD or Linux variants and give up on OpenSolaris.

These concerns raised many times in the mailing list to the point where “OpenSolaris is dead/ is dying” messages surpass all other technical discussions and Some of thees messages  seemed inappropriate enough for the Oracle staff to threaten that they are prepared to take action  up to “moderation and/or deactivation” of the list.

Jim Grisanzio: warning about mail on this list – [Tue Jun 29 16:43:47 UTC 2010]@ http://mail.opensolaris.org/pipermail/opensolaris-discuss/2010-June/057703.html

Recently there has been mail on this list that violates the website Terms of Use. Individuals are being warned. However, if this trend continues the Website Team is prepared to take action up to and including moderation and/or deactivation of the list. Please do not respond to hostile posts because that only escalates the situation.

Many more messages posted to the list with different comments and analysis of situation with Solaris/ OpenSolaris product and project.  These comments lead to another warning from Oracle staff:

Alan Burlison: Yet another warning about behaviour on this list – [Thu Jul 15 14:41:16 UTC 2010]@http://mail.opensolaris.org/pipermail/opensolaris-discuss/2010-July/058383.html

Despite repeated warnings, some people are continuing to badmouth each other on this list.  As explained previously, this is not acceptable. We’ve been warning people who have overstepped the mark, from this point on we won’t be doing that, we’ll just be immediately closing accounts and unsubscribing people from all of the opensolaris.org  lists.

If that proves ineffective we will consider other measures such as putting the list into moderation or shutting it down entirely.
Be quite clear, this unacceptable behaviour must stop, and now.

Apologies to the vast majority of the list members who clearly aren’t the cause of the problem.

The Oracle silence take long enough and the “OpenSolaris is dead/ going to die…” threads number and messages grow big enough to the point where OGB decided to weigh in and take action, but OGB has almost no control over anything these days and the only thing that they decided to do is calling on Oracle publicly and letting Oracle staff know that they are going to step down and resign from being the OGB if they have no power, official knowledge about what is the faith of the software that they are governing. @ http://wiki.genunix.org:8080/wiki/index.php/2010_07_12_OGB_Agenda

The OGB is keen to promote the uptake and open development of OpenSolaris and to work on behalf of the community with Oracle, as such the OGB needs Oracle to appoint a liaison by August 16, 2010, who has the authority to talk about the future of OpenSolaris and its interaction with the OpenSolaris community. Otherwise the OGB will take action at the August 23 meeting to trigger the clause in the OGB charter that will return control of the community to Oracle.

Now that OGB decided to publicly call on Oracle as a body of members elected by the community, Oracle need to send some response back. But what can be the response from Oracle? I think one of the following will happen:

  • Oracle will appoint a liaison and take part in the governance board, restructure it and assure community about the what is going on.
  • Oracle will act like nothing happened and no message like that has even been published but come forth with some resolutions at a later time after the ultimatum ended.
  • Oracle will come forth with some tanks and carrier class ships filled with Stark industries Iron Men and close down the project axing everyone posted harsh comments 😀

I believe the first alternative is what will happen despite some of the community members believe on some version of the last alternative and demolish of OpenSolaris.

Introducing NIO.2 (JSR 203) Part 4: Changing File System Attributes and Permissions

This is the 4th installment of my entries covering NIO.2. In this entry I will discuss more about what we can do with attributes and permissions.  The NIO.2 lets us write the permissions and attributes of a file in addition to reading them. For example we can change the rwx permissions using the Attributes utility class and  PosixFilePermission.

You can execute the following sample code with almost no changes, the only thing you need to change is the path to our sample file and then you are ready to see how it works.

import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.file.*;
import java.nio.file.attribute.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Perm2 {

    public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException {
        FileSystem fs = FileSystems.getDefault();
        Path p = fs.getPath("/home/masoud/dl");

        // Reading attributes using attributes views.
        // here we read both basic and posix attributes of a file
        Map att = (Map) p.readAttributes("posix:*, basic:*", LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS);
        // printing the attributes to output
        Set en = att.keySet();
        for (Iterator it = en.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
            String string = it.next();
            System.out.println(string + ": " + att.get(string));
        }
        System.out.println("-------------Attributes printing finished----------");

        // definind a new permission set for our file
        Set
 st2 = PosixFilePermissions.fromString("rwxrwxrwx");
        // Setting the attribute using Attributes utility class
        Attributes.setPosixFilePermissions(p, st2);

        // looking up and creating a principal for the given user. If use does
        // not exists it will throws a UserPrincipalNotFoundException
        UserPrincipal up = fs.getUserPrincipalLookupService().lookupPrincipalByName("masoud");

        // Setting the owner to the owner we just looked up.
        // We should have enough permisison to change the owner otherwise it will
        // throw a FileSystemException: /home/masoud/a: Operation not permitted sort of thing
        Attributes.setOwner(p, up);

        //another way to read and write the owner value for a file is using FileOwnerAttributeView
        FileOwnerAttributeView fo = p.getFileAttributeView(FileOwnerAttributeView.class, LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS);
        fo.setOwner(up);

        //Now that we have changed the permissions lets see the permissions again:
        att = (Map) p.readAttributes("posix:permissions", LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS);
        System.out.println("New Permissions:" + ": " + att.get("permissions"));
    }
}

Let’s see what we have done starting from top: at the beginning we have just initialized the FileSystem object and got a file reference to /home/masoud/dl. Then we read all of this files basic and posix attributes using the attributes view notation. The following sample code shows this step

 FileSystem fs = FileSystems.getDefault();
        Path p = fs.getPath("/home/masoud/dl");

        // Reading attributes using attributes views.
        // here we read both basic and posix attributes of a file
        Map att = (Map) p.readAttributes("posix:*, basic:*", LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS);
        // printing the attributes to output
        Set en = att.keySet();
        for (Iterator it = en.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
            String string = it.next();
            System.out.println(string + ": " + att.get(string));
        }
System.out.println("-------------Attributes printing finished----------");

Next step we have use the PosixPermissions class to create a permission set using the OS permissions presentation and then applied these permissions on our file

 // definind a new permission set for our file
        Set
 st2 = PosixFilePermissions.fromString("rwxrwxrwx");
        // Setting the attribute using Attributes utility class
        Attributes.setPosixFilePermissions(p, st2);

In the next step we created a user principal for a user named masoud and changed the ownership of our file to this user. We have done this using both available methods.

// looking up and creating a principal for the given user. If use does
        // not exists it will throws a UserPrincipalNotFoundException
        UserPrincipal up = fs.getUserPrincipalLookupService().lookupPrincipalByName("masoud");

        // Setting the owner to the owner we just looked up.
        // We should have enough permisison to change the owner otherwise it will
        // throw a FileSystemException: /home/masoud/a: Operation not permitted sort of thing
        Attributes.setOwner(p, up);

        //another way to read and write the owner value for a file is using FileOwnerAttributeView
        FileOwnerAttributeView fo = p.getFileAttributeView(FileOwnerAttributeView.class, LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS);
        fo.setOwner(up);

Finally we read the file permissions to see what has changed after we applied this new permissions on our file. using the following snippet.

 //Now that we have changed the permissions lets see the permissions again:
        att = (Map) p.readAttributes("posix:permissions", LinkOption.NOFOLLOW_LINKS);
        System.out.println("New Permissions:" + ": " + att.get("permissions"));

The output of running the above sample code is shown below:

lastModifiedTime: 2010-07-06T23:15:32Z
fileKey: (dev=805,ino=1922268)
isDirectory: false
lastAccessTime: 2010-07-11T14:15:46Z
isOther: false
isSymbolicLink: false
owner: masoud
permissions: [OTHERS_READ, OWNER_WRITE, GROUP_WRITE, OWNER_READ, GROUP_READ, OTHERS_EXECUTE, OWNER_EXECUTE, GROUP_EXECUTE, OTHERS_WRITE]
isRegularFile: true
creationTime: null
group: dip
size: 219
-------------Attributes printing finished----------
Permissions:: [OTHERS_READ, OWNER_WRITE, GROUP_WRITE, OWNER_READ, GROUP_READ, OTHERS_EXECUTE, OWNER_EXECUTE, GROUP_EXECUTE, OTHERS_WRITE]

You may ask what is the attribute view notation and what is meaning of that posix:permissions or posix:*. The first one means that we want to retrieve the permissions property of the file while the second one means that we want to retrieve all attributes of the file which can be seen using the posix view.

Now you are asking where you can found list of this attributes view notations, then you question is very right. The following links shows what attributes are available to read using each one of those views. Each attribute is one of the properties included in the interface.

Sure we have other views, you can find them in the JavaDocs linked above.

Next entry will be the last entry covering File System functionalities of the NIO.2 including the watch and change notification service and the ACL list. After that we will look at new features included for IO developers. You can find other entries of this series under the NIO.2 tag of my weblog.

My weblog is now migrated to its new location, kalali.me

I have been blogging for the past 4 years in my java.net blog which is now 301 redirected to its new home at kalali.me. In mid 2006 I joined Netcat 50, NetBeans quality asurance team for netbeans 5.0 release, and it was the starting point for me to get involved with Java community in more open way and lead to filing a request to get a weblog at Java.net.

The main reason and motive behid starting the blog was sharing my experience about NetBeans platform and java development but in years the blog grown up to a point where I post 6 chapters of my unpublished GlassFish book there and post many other long articles discussing Java EE and other topics including security and software architecture among others.

In the past 4 years, I post 74 blog entries and  my weblog served around 200,000 page views and 160,000 visits. Majority of visitors were using Linux and Firefox according to my, now deleted by mistake, google analytics data. The biggest referal site was Java.net itself where my weblog get promoted to the first page and google was the main search engine leading readers to my weblog.

What I will always remember from my Java.net blog is friends I found through the blog and the friendly community and staff behind Java.net and its infrastructure which were and are working around the clock to keep Java.net a professional environment for everyone involved and uses Java.net. Even when I was leaving Java.net they did not stop taking care of my request and kindly applied 301 redirects to all my current blog entries to redirect them to their new location, which in my opinion show how professional they act and think.

But the reason behind moving to my personal domain from the exceptional java.net hosting and community is the flexibility I need to keep all my content in the sam place instead of keeping some content on java.net blog and some other content on my personal website.

In the next few weeks I will include more pages to my new website including a page for my GlassFish security book to have a better communication channel with my readers and a new page for the book I am authoring now. My new website will include my photoblog as anothe part. I am not a professional photographer and I will look for comments and advices from friends and readers whom are more experienced on photography compared to what I know and experienced.

If  you are a reader of my weblog then you can follow me using the new domain and the new feed url. The new domain will serve readers and visitors in a more interactive and easy to find way.

Long live Java.net and its professional team.